Research Article Open Access

Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Quantifying Methane Emissions from Livestock

Rafiu O. Yusuf1, Zainura Z. Noor1, Ahmad H. Abba1, Mohd Ariffin Abu Hassan1 and Mohd Fadhil Mohd Din1
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American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Volume 5 No. 1, 2012, 1-8

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3844/ajeassp.2012.1.8

Submitted On: 25 October 2011 Published On: 31 January 2012

How to Cite: Yusuf, R. O., Noor, Z. Z., Abba, A. H., Hassan, M. A. A. & Din, M. F. M. (2012). Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Quantifying Methane Emissions from Livestock. American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 5(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.3844/ajeassp.2012.1.8

Abstract

Problem statement: The rearing of animals for domestic consumption and export invariably lead to the production of methane as a product of digestion. This study investigated the emission of methane from Malaysian livestock between 1980 and 2008. Approach: Seven categories of animals identified were camel, buffalo, sheep, goats, horse, pigs and poultry. The estimation of methane was based on the IPCC Tier 1 and Tier 2 methods. Methane emission from cattle rose by 44% within the period from 45.61-65.57 Gg. Results: Buffalo recorded a drop in methane emission by 54% from 17.12-7.86 Gg while the methane emission from sheep initially rose by 350% in 1992 only to drop by another 56% by 2008. Goats emission only declined by 17% from 1.79 Gg in 1980-1.49 Gg by 2008. Methane emission from horse has been consistent at around 0.14 Gg. The decreasing stock of pigs has led to a drop in methane emission from these set of animals with most of the emission coming from manure management. Conclusion: The healthy export market for poultry has seen a rise in methane emission by 274% from 2.18 Gg in 1980-8.17 Gg by 2008. The overall increase in methane emission from all the livestock is 20% from 81.83 Gg in 1980-98.76 Gg in 2008. With the aggressive drive of government to boost cattle and goat production, there is the likelihood of an increase in methane emission in the future and mitigation options will have to be applied.

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Keywords

  • Enteric fermentation
  • manure management
  • surface temperature
  • uncontrolled release
  • microbial activities
  • National Boer Breeding Centre (NBBC)