Research Article Open Access

Socio-Economic Aspect of African Manatee (Trichechus Senegalensis) Hunting and Capturing in Parts of Ogun and Ondo State, Southwest Nigeria

Kabir O. Abass1, Abiodun K. Seriki1, Emmanuel O. Orebiyi1, Olayinka Ewuyemi1 and Olayinka Adeseja1
  • 1 Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria
American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Volume 15 No. 1, 2020, 107-117

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3844/ajabssp.2020.107.117

Published On: 18 June 2020

How to Cite: Abass, K. O., Seriki, A. K., Orebiyi, E. O., Ewuyemi, O. & Adeseja, O. (2020). Socio-Economic Aspect of African Manatee (Trichechus Senegalensis) Hunting and Capturing in Parts of Ogun and Ondo State, Southwest Nigeria. American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Sciences, 15(1), 107-117. https://doi.org/10.3844/ajabssp.2020.107.117

Abstract

This research was carried out to understand the emerging practice of hunting, capturing and trading of African manatee (Trichechus senegalensis) by fishermen and hunters in Iwopin lagoon area of Ogun State and some parts of Ondo State, Southwest Nigeria. The African Manatee has been declared an endangered species under IUCN red list. This research was conducted over one year to understand the period and factors influencing fishermen to hunt, capture and culture the animals in fish pond enclosure. The study deploys and employed immersion survey approach with enumerators staying with the fishermen in the survey communities. Analysis of the survey indicated that 70% of manatee hunters are adults in the age range of 31-60.55% of respondents use traditional traps to capture manatee and 43% uses drag fishing net (Ifatiko). The study further reveals that while 30% of the hunters captures manatee and keep it alive in fish ponds to sell it alive to buyers, 28% do so to sought for parts of its body particularly the oil and bones for medicinal purposes. Of the total 100 respondents, 21% opined that training fishing group on alternative livelihoods will help to promote conservation of the endangered sea creature, 20% suggested liaising with conservation agents on the need to train fishermen on how to rear manatee in its natural habitat. Alternative livelihood strategies and community conservation practices is recommended for the fishermen/hunters in order to prevent the practice of illegal capture and trade of Manatee.

Download

Keywords

  • Trichechus Senegalensis
  • Fishermen
  • Rearing
  • Hunting
  • Conservation
  • Illegal Wildlife Trade