Research Article Open Access

Growth, Feed Utilization and Haematology of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell,1822) Fingerlings Fed Diets Containing Different Levels of Vitamin C

M. Adunni Adewolu1 and O. Olakunle Aro1
  • 1 , Afganistan
American Journal of Applied Sciences
Volume 6 No. 9, 2009, 1675-1681

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3844/ajassp.2009.1675.1681

Submitted On: 14 August 2009 Published On: 30 September 2009

How to Cite: Adewolu, M. A. & Aro, O. O. (2009). Growth, Feed Utilization and Haematology of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell,1822) Fingerlings Fed Diets Containing Different Levels of Vitamin C. American Journal of Applied Sciences, 6(9), 1675-1681. https://doi.org/10.3844/ajassp.2009.1675.1681

Abstract

Problem statement: In an effort to increase growth, improve feed utilization, reduce stress and prevent certain diseases, a 14 week feeding trial was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of dietary vitamin C (ascorbic acid) on growth, feed utilization and hematological changes in Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. Approach: Diets were formulated to contain 0, 50, 100, 150, 500, 1000 and 1500 mg L-ascorbic acid kg-1 of feed contributing 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% to the formulated diets respectively. Fish of mean weight 10.12±0.7 g were fed on experimental diets in triplicate groups. Weight gain of fish fed diet with 0% of vitamin C were significantly (p<0.05) lower than those fed on supplemented vitamin C diets. Fish fed diet with 1.5% of vitamin C showed a significantly (p<0.05) higher weight gain than fish fed on other diets. However, there were no significant (p>0.05) differences in weight gain among the fish fed diets containing 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15% of vitamin C. Generally, fish fed vitamin C supplemented diets showed better growth rate, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency compared with those without vitamin C supplementation. Results: The results of hematological analyses of fish showed that red blood cell, white blood cell, haemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume were not significantly (p>0.05) affected by vitamin C supplemented diets. Fish fed the vitamin C-free diet begin to show deficiency signs such as erratic swimming, flashing, skin darkening and reduced growth at 12 weeks of feeding trial. Conclusion: This study indicated that 50 mg kg-1 of ascorbic acid is sufficient to prevent C. gariepinus fingerlings from developing clinical symptoms relating to vitamin C deficiency. A mega dose of 1500 mg kg-1 of ascorbic acid gave maximum growth performance and feed utilization efficiency.

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Keywords

  • Vitamin C
  • growth
  • feed utilization
  • haematology
  • Clarias gariepinus