Current Research in Medicine

IMPACT OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE IN PREVENTION OF PARACETAMOL INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY IN RATS

Abbas O. Elkarib

DOI : 10.3844/amjsp.2014.16.27

Current Research in Medicine

Volume 5, Issue 1

Pages 16-27

Abstract

Paracetamol (PCM) overdose can cause nephrotoxicity with oxidative stress as one of the possible mechanisms mediating the event. However, Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the major secretory product of the human adrenal gland, has been shown to possess a multi-targeted antioxidant activity which is also effective against lipid peroxidation induced in various animal models and against various human disorders. In this study, the preventive effect of DHEA against PCM-induced nephrotoxicity was examined. Rats were divided into four groups containing 10 rats each, as follows: A control: Received normal saline, Vehicle treated: Received the vehicle (5% DMSO), PCM model (750 mg kg-1), PCM and DHEA treated: Received concomitant dose of PCM (750 mg kg-1) + DHEA (250 mg kg-1), respectively, for 4 consecutive weeks. All treatment were given orally to animals. Our results show that co-treatment of DHEA with PCM prevented the PCM-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative impairments of the kidney, as evidenced by a significantly reduced (p<0.05) level of serum creatinine, urea and BUN with parallel significant increases in serum protein, Cr clearance and kidneys weights. Furthermore, DHEA was able to induce a significant increment (p<0.05) of renal levels of reduced Glutathione (GSH) and activities of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Glutathione Peroxidise (GPx). An effect that was accompanied with a significant decrease in renal lipid peroxides levels (MDA). The nephroprotective effects of DHEA was confirmed by a reduced intensity of renal cellular damage, as evidenced by histological findings. In conclusion, DHEA at a daily dose of 250 mg kg-1 has a protective role against PCM-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and the process is probably mediated through its antioxidant properties.

Copyright

© 2014 Abbas O. Elkarib. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.