American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology

Comparison of Heavy Metals Contents for Some Cigarettes Brands

Lucien Agbandji, Edorh A. Patrick, Georges B. Gbago, Luc Koumolou, Sosthene Adisso, Patient Guedenon, Soulemane Ahodjide, Brice Sinsin and Michel Boko

DOI : 10.3844/ajptsp.2012.149.153

American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology

Volume 7, Issue 4

Pages 149-153

Abstract

According certain studies, smoking could be associated with an increase of health risk link to heavy metals and these risks would be more important in developed countries. So, this study attempted to verify these informations throuth the comparison of the levels of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) nickel (Ni) and arsenic (As) in some cigarettes sold in Benin and France. Composite samples of cigarette brands purchased in Benin (developing country) and France have been taken in the same periods from the two countries. Samples were analyzed for cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni) and arsenic (As) by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The amounts (average ± SD) have been compared by the statistical Student p test (T>t) = 0.05. The results showed that all the cigarettes tobacco is differently contaminated with Cd, Pb, Ni and As. The amounts reveal that for all metals the regulatory limits are over passed but the level of contamination varies from one brand to another one. However, it could not be obvious to conclude that the cigarettes in developed countries are more concentrated in heavy metals than those of developing countries. This affirmation has been discussed. Indeed, it appeared that the level of lead and arsenic obtained in some cigarette brands purchased in Benin were significantly higher than (p<0.05) those sold in France. Otherwise, all the France cigarette brands contain about two or three times more cadmium that Beninese cigarettes. However, excepted these particularities, there was no significant differences (p<0.05) between heavy metals contents in cigarette brands sold in Benin and France. Overall, findings from this study suggest that, Beninese cigarettes did not differ in heavy metals contents from cigarettes sold in France markets. The high levels of toxic metals recorded in some cigarette tobacco from each country are probably the result of soil conditions where tobacco is grown. But, the presence of high levels of heavy metals may constitute a global health concern. The adoption of reasonable behavior are needed to preserve the public health.

Copyright

© 2012 Lucien Agbandji, Edorh A. Patrick, Georges B. Gbago, Luc Koumolou, Sosthene Adisso, Patient Guedenon, Soulemane Ahodjide, Brice Sinsin and Michel Boko. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.