American Journal of Environmental Sciences

Comparability Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Tissue Load in Some Fish: Implication on Reciprocal Synergism and Risk Assessment

Victor Eshu Okpashi, Ogugua Victor Nwadiogbu , Joshua Parkar Elijah, Chibuike Samuel Ubani, Obinna Aru Oje, David Mbu Akpo, Robert Ikechukwu Uroko and Ikechukwu Noel Onwurah

DOI : 10.3844/ajessp.2017.182.190

American Journal of Environmental Sciences

Volume 13, Issue 2

Pages 182-190

Abstract

Six years after oil spill occur in Qua Ibeo river, environmental monitoring was set out to investigate residual petroleum compounds (PHCs) that are bio-accumulated by fish. Bio-concentration of residual Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fish tissues was determined in six fresh fish species. Twelve water samples were collected from Qua Ibeo river 1 KM apart. The screening was conducted using Agilent gas chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy. Results revealed 17 PAHs accumulated at variable concentrations. Bio-concentration factor and free PAHs in water was calculated by finding the ratio of PAHs concentration in fish tissue to water free PAHs concentration. The contaminant body load was extrapolated by summation of individual PAHs concentration. Results shows African Red snipper (Lutjanus agennes) 20.822±0.6132 with body load as the highest, Yellow tail (Seriola lalandi) 13.111±1.247, Atlantic Crocker (Micropogonias undulates) 9.8439±6.569, Tilpia (Oreochromis niloticus) 9.7790±12.305, Cat Fish (Clarias gariepinus) 7.298±4.529 and Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) 6.853±7.937 respectively. The percentage PAHs concentration in samples was also determined, for instance, African red snapper have 10.9% Indeno (1,2,3,cd) pyrene, Yellow tail 10.94% Benzo (a) pyrene, Barracuda 10.05% Indeno (1,2,3,cd) pyrene, Atlantic Croker 13.03% Indeno (1,2,3,cd) pyrene, Catfish 9.61% Indeno (1,2,3,cd) pyrene and Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) 11.84% Indeno (1,2,3,cd) pyrene respectively.

Copyright

© 2017 Victor Eshu Okpashi, Ogugua Victor Nwadiogbu , Joshua Parkar Elijah, Chibuike Samuel Ubani, Obinna Aru Oje, David Mbu Akpo, Robert Ikechukwu Uroko and Ikechukwu Noel Onwurah. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.