Characterization of the Adsorption of the Lead (II) by the Nonliving Biomass Spirogyra neglecta (Hasall) Kutzing | Science Publications

American Journal of Biochemistry and Biotechnology

Characterization of the Adsorption of the Lead (II) by the Nonliving Biomass Spirogyra neglecta (Hasall) Kutzing

Modher A. Hussain, Aishah Salleh and Pozi Milow

DOI : 10.3844/ajbbsp.2009.75.83

American Journal of Biochemistry and Biotechnology

Volume 5, Issue 2

Pages 75-83

Abstract

Problem statement: Conventional techniques for removing dissolved heavy metals are only practical and cost-effective when applied to high strength wastes with heavy metal ion concentrations greater than 100 ppm. The possibility of using a nonliving algal biomass to solve this problem was carried in this study. Lead (II) was used in this study because it had been reported to cause several disorders in human. Approach: The nonliving algal biomass was obtained from a filamentous green alga Spirogyra neglecta. The effects of initial concentration and contact time, pH and temperature on the biosorption of lead (II) by the nonliving algal biomass were studied. The equilibrium isotherms and kinetics were obtained from batch adsorption experiments. The surface characteristics of the nonliving algal biomass were examined using scanning electron microscope and Fourier Transformed Infrared. The maximum adsorption capacity of the nonliving algal biomass was also determined. Results: Maximum adsorption capacity of lead (II) was affected by its initial concentration. Adsorption capacity of lead (II) increased with the pH and temperature of lead (II) solution. Langmuir isothermic model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isothermic model. The adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The nonliving algal biomass exhibited acaves-like, uneven surface texture along with lot of irregular surface. FTIR analysis of the alga biomass revealed the presence of carboyl, amine and carboxyl group which were responsible for adsorption of lead (II). The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) of lead (II) by the nonliving biomass of Spirogyra neglecta was 132 mg g-1. Conclusion: The maximum adsorption capacity for lead (II) by the nonliving biomass of Spirogyra neglecta was higher than reported for other biosorbents. Therefore, it had a great potential for removing lead (II) from polluted water. Its use will also need to consider the various factors that affect biosorption process.

Copyright

© 2009 Modher A. Hussain, Aishah Salleh and Pozi Milow. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.